Thursday, 10 August 2017

Meaningful external partnerships (PART 2): "Nothing About Us Without Us"

In my last post, I invited readers to view the design of external partnerships for learning and teaching through the lens of Lean Startup methodology (Ries 2011), based upon the development of USE's 'Making Ideas Happen' (MIH) module.

To recap: in considering whether it would be beneficial to use external partners, designers of a learning experience need to ask:
Grey tarmac, viewed from above, on which is painted the word "respect" in all upper-case bold, red, stencilled lettering with a white drop shadow
“Should we use external partnerships for this project?”
And if so:
“How can we use them in a way that is both sustainable and manageable?”
We considered our first 'customer' segment - students. But of course, we only scratched the surface of this approach, and I now want to turn my focus to our other key 'customer' - the external partner.

Monday, 7 August 2017

Risky Business...

One of our five Enterprise Capabilities that we want to develop in students is 'Risk taking'.

This is the one capability where, when we discuss it with colleagues who teach in The University, we might see a wince. Much like this.



via GIPHY

Monday, 31 July 2017

Meaningful external partnerships (PART 1): Thinking "Lean" about partnership design

Whiteboard, with coloured pen annotations on tips for working with external partners, e.g. building the relationship well in advance, working closely to develop the problem, and not overestimating effort involved.
The Enterprise Academy team is chiefly known, and widely recognised for, the support we provide to academic colleagues to embed enterprise in their specific subject curricula. USE does, however, have well-established, in-house teaching and assessment responsibilities.

'Making Ideas Happen' (MIH), USE's interdisciplinary credit-bearing module, is now almost seven years old.

Unlike everything else we do, MIH is not embedded enterprise. True embedded enterprise uses a core subject discipline as a vehicle for enterprise capability (EC) development (and vice versa), MIH's vehicle for EC development, on the other hand, is entrepreneurship education, with a firm focus on fulfilling social aims.

Embedded or not, however, the work we've undertaken on MIH feeds greatly into our work with academics.

Friday, 30 June 2017

Not an entrepreneur? Why this doesn't matter. (PART 2 OF 2)

In my previous post on this subject, I explored the idea of intrapreneurship (Pinchott & Pinchott 1978) in higher education, and highlighted a number of examples of where intrapreneurship as a concept is, itself, being used in the delivery of embedded enterprise education.

It seems true that in undertaking and delivering truly innovative curriculum development and teaching, the developers and deliverers of that teaching must sometimes behave as institutionally-located entrepreneurs.

But is this really the case? Are they truly supported to do so? Are the parallels between innovative learning and teaching, entrepreneurship, and intrapreneurship meaningful enough to be acknowledged as real?

And does it even matter whether they are, or not?

Thursday, 6 April 2017

Not an entrepreneur? Why this doesn't matter. (PART 1 OF 2)

I've previously confessed, in a blog post on University of Sheffield Enterprise's student-facing website, to the fact that, while I'm an enterprise education practitioner, I'm not an entrepreneur. Despite being immersed in this field for over six years, the word "entrepreneur" itself has always sat somewhat uncomfortably with me. I have never run my own business. I have never formally studied business. My professional experience is firmly rooted in education development, and learning and teaching innovation.

In the field of enterprise education, we suffer from a long-standing vocabulary issue. So many people seem to have issues with the words 'enterprise' and 'entrepreneurship'.

And I'm not alone in feeling like this.

Monday, 27 March 2017

CASE STUDY: Talking The Talk: Getting Science On Film



Title


APS 279 Talking The Talk: Getting Science On Film

Subject Area


Animal and Plant Sciences

Module Overview


Many science students express an intention to go into science communication as a career. Dr Millie Mockford, a University Teacher in Animal and Plant Sciences, realised that there was a lack of opportunity for students to gain real-life experience in this area, or to develop material for portfolios to present to employers or clients. Millie initially developed an extracurricular pilot activity in which students produced films to communicate departmental research, but since then the activity has developed into APS 279 ‘Talking the Talk’, a 5, soon to be 10, credit optional module.

Thursday, 23 March 2017

Assessing creativity - where to start? (PART 2 of 2)

In part 1 of this post, we looked at whether students believed creativity was something they experienced in the curriculum, and ways in which educators could begin to assess creativity, particularly in STEM subjects. In the first part, we looked at assessing creative outputs, in this post we will look at ways of assessing the creative process.